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GSBC Meetings, Special Events, and Classes

GSBC Meetings + Presentations
GSBC Meetings are held every 4th Monday of the month (except holidays and December). General Meetings include a brief business meeting. Meetings start promptly at 7pm in the Ridgewood Public Library Auditorium, 125 N. Maple Ave., Ridgewood, NJ. Phone (201) 670-5600 (see map, above), unless otherwise noted. Your membership dues directly supports this programming and allows us to host speakers on a wide variety of topics — thank you!

GSBC Special Events + Seminars
The GSBC holds several special events, including our day-long Annual Seminar and late-night RPL Lock-In—where genealogists can attend talks on a variety of subjects, collaborate on problems, and receive one-on-one research assistance. Additional event fee may apply. Discount for GSBC members.

GSBC Classes + Ridgewood Public Library Programs
The Bolger Heritage Center at the Ridgewood Public Library holds events on local history and genealogy-focused computer classes. Ridgewood residents and GSBC members receive a discount on these events. Included in the calendar below are RPL classes of interest to genealogists and local researchers. Please check the full RPL calendar for class information, fees, registration, cancellations, and for classes on other topics. All registration is through the Ridgewood Public Library calendar or by calling (201) 670-5600.

Additionally, the GSBC holds in-depth courses, for those 55 and older, at Bergen Community College, Institute for Learning and Retirement (BCC-ILR). Please check our calendar for registration dates, visit the BCC-ILR website, or contact BCC-ILR at 201-447-7156.


Below is our complete calendar showing all Meetings, Events, Seminars. Library Programs and Classes. Use the Category filter below to hide the events in a specific category.


 

Mar
25
Mon
Using the New Jersey Room at the Jersey City Free Public Library for Genealogical Research @ Ridgewood Public Library
Mar 25 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

GSBC General Meeting + Presentation
Monday, 25 March, 7 PM
Ridgewood Public Library—All Are Welcome

Using the New Jersey Room at the Jersey City Free Public Library for Genealogical Research

Hundreds of years before Ellis Island welcomed millions of immigrants from 1892 to 1954, the village of Bergen, the oldest municipality in New Jersey, was home to some of the earliest European settlers. Since then, Jersey City has welcomed families from around the world. Some spent only a short time there while others settled down for decades, over generations, in the Jersey City and greater Hudson County area.

The New Jersey Room contains collections about New Jersey with an emphasis on Jersey City and Hudson County. The collection, numbering about 20,000 volumes, includes both current and historical information. In addition to books, the New Jersey Room has a complete collection of all published Jersey City/Hoboken city directories dating from 1849 to 1925; an index for the Jersey Journal for the years 1912–1954 and 1969 to the present, a picture collection of over 13,000 images; hundreds of historic and contemporary maps; over 150 periodicals; manuscript collections; and several thousand topical files. A wide array of material—from 17th century handwritten documents to name-indexed Hudson County high school yearbooks (1,450 and counting)—awaits you.

Learn more about this important repository! http://www.jclibrary.org/locations-a-hours/main-library/new-jersey-room

Free and open to the public—all are welcome.


Cynthia Tosatto Harris has worked for the City of Jersey City since she was 21 years old and is still working for the City 45 years later. She was first a public schoolteacher at PS # 14 and 27. A second career began when she became Manager of the New Jersey Room of the Jersey City Free Public Library in 2001.

Apr
22
Mon
Through the Golden Door: Immigration After the Civil War @ Ridgewood Public Library
Apr 22 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

GSBC General Meeting + Presentation
Monday, 22 April, 7pm
Ridgewood Public Library—All Are Welcome

Through the Golden Door: Immigration After the Civil War

America’s doors were open to all before the Civil War, with few restrictions. Afterwards, the laws began tightening, with exclusions, quotas, even required visas. How did the immigration laws affect your ancestors who immigrated after the Civil War? What hoops did they have to jump through to enter America’s “golden door”?

Free and open to the public—all are welcome. 


Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

Jun
24
Mon
The Hermitage: Its History and Its Families @ Ridgewood Public Library
Jun 24 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

GSBC General Meeting + Presentation
Monday, 24 June, 7pm
Ridgewood Public Library—All Are Welcome

The Hermitage: Its History and Its Families

The history of the Hermitage was shaped by the families who lived there.

During the American Revolution, the Hermitage was home to Theodosia Prevost, the wife of a British officer. While her husband was away, Theodosia saw the war play out around her in Bergen County. And when her beloved home was threatened, she entered the fray, engaging in a battle of intelligence and charm to defend her family.

Theodosia's husband died during the War and the same year she married Aaron Burr at The Hermitage. Burr later became Vice President of the United States—and while in office killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel in Weehawken, New Jersey.

In 1807, the Hermitage was purchased by Dr. Elijah Rosencrantz and his wife Cornelia Suffern. The Rosencrantz family would call the Hermitage home until 1970, when Mary Elizabeth, the last member of the family, died and willed her home to the State of New Jersey. Four generations of the Rosencrantz family lived and worked at the Hermitage, actively participating in the changing landscape of Bergen County, from sprawling farmlands and hamlet towns, to centers of industry, commerce, and suburbs.

Free and open to the public—all are welcome.


Victoria Harty is the Executive Director of The Hermitage Museum, A National Historic Landmark in Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey. She earned a Bachelor of Arts from Bennington College and two Master's Degrees from New York University. She has worked in the field of public history and historic preservation for the past decade in various institutions in Vermont, New York, and New Jersey. Victoria has been involved with The Hermitage Museum as an intern and, since 2011, as a staff member.